All-New Transmission Interface Debuts on 2018 GMC Terrain

All-New Transmission Interface

Sometimes it’s the little things that truly take something from good to great — or, in the case of the 2018 GMC Terrain, from great to excellent.

The on-deck GMC Terrain is full of “final touches” that create an altogether refined driving experience, but one of the features our GMC-enthusiasts here at Dan Young are most excited for has to be the all-new transmission interface. Yes, “all-new transmission interface” might sound a little boring at first, but let us explain.

The transmission interface on the 2018 GMC Terrain completely does away with the old-fashioned toggle gear shifter system. Instead, GMC is introducing a simplified toggle-and-button system. That might seem crazy — it is certainly untraditional — but there are more than just a few good reasons for this innovation.

First and foremost, this new transmission interface just looks good. In the place of an awkward shifter jutting up in the middle of your pilot area, there is a simple set of cleanly designed buttons. The overall effect is a more elegant and modernized interior.

Beyond aesthetics, this new redesign frees up a lot of space around the driver for more comfort and accessibility: no shifter, no clutter.

Finally, the all-new transmission interface is just easier to use: toggle to drive, toggle to reverse, push a button to park, go neutral, or enter low gear. It’s as easy as that.

Are you curious to see the new 2018 GMC Terrain? You can catch a glimpse (and maybe a test drive) right here at Dan Young!

GM AutoDrive Challenge Develops Self-Driving Cars

GM recently announced that it would be working with eight major North American universities to compete in the GM AutoDrive Challenge. This autonomous vehicle design competition runs three years, asking competitors to develop and demonstrate a car that drives itself. Unlike previous technologies, this car must be entirely self-driven.

According to GM, the schools competition include Kettering University, Michigan State, Michigan Tech, North Carolina A&T, Texas A&M, University of Toronto, Waterloo, and Virginia Tech. Students will work with systems like sensors, computer platforms, pattern recognition, machine learning, and more. We can’t wait to see what these students come up with over the next three years.

“SAE International is excited to expand our partnership with GM to build the future STEM workforce through the AutoDrive Challenge™,” said Chris Ciuca, a director at SAE International. “Building on our success through programs like Formula SAE, the AutoDrive Challenge™ launches a new platform to engage industry and academia in working towards a common goal of preparing the brightest young minds for the future of autonomous technologies.”

Each research team gets a Chevrolet Bolt EV to test and build on, working to customize software and vehicle components. Staff and students will also be invited to tech workshops over the three years in order to brush up on the latest technologies. At Dan Young GM, we’re excited to see these fully autonomous vehicles in action.